Contents of blog copyright Book Dragon's Lair 2009-2017



Just a heads up that I'm going dark for several weeks. I may still update posts/challenges but there will be no new content, not even Thursdays.

My Mom died and I'm taking each day as it comes, plus helping my Dad go through her stuff.

Jan 16 update: Mother-in-law, who I call Mom, is in the hospital for bypass surgery

Feb 19 update: MIL is home now :-D and slowly getting better. I'm still helping my Dad with Mom's stuff but since my brother is out of town, I'm spending 4 nights at his house every week for a month. It's MUCH closer to Dad's and they do meals together and hang out.

Mar 8 update: I'm having a blast with my Dad. MIL has gone back to the hospital

Mar 29 update: MIL is home but not doing well.

Apr 9 update: SIL is nurse and has taken time off work to care for MIL who is basically receiving hospice care at home.

I'll see you in May . . . April 23 update: My Mother-in-law, who I call Mom, died yesterday.

Friday, September 9, 2016

Spotlight On . . . Disaster Falls, a family story

Disaster Falls
a family story

Author: Stéphane Gerson
Publisher: Penguin Random House
Imprint: Crown Publishers
ISBN: 978-1-101-90669-9
Published: January 24, 2017
genre: Memoirs
272 pages

format available: hardcover, ebook

I didn't find any social media for this author

Description:
On a day like any other, on a rafting trip down Utah’s Green River, Stéphane Gerson’s eight-year-old son, Owen, drowned in a spot known as Disaster Falls. That same night, as darkness fell, Stéphane huddled in a tent with his wife, Alison, and their older son, Julian, trying to understand what seemed inconceivable. “It’s just the three of us now,” Alison said over the sounds of a light rain and, nearby, the rushing river. “We cannot do it alone. We have to stick together.”

Disaster Falls chronicles the aftermath of that day and their shared determination to stay true to Alison’s resolution. Gerson captures the different ways of grieving that threatened to isolate each of them in their post-Owen worlds and then, with beautiful specificity, shows how he and Alison preserved and reconfigured their marriage from within. Blending family history (including the “good death” of his father, which offers a very different perspective on mortality) and the natural history of the river, he provides an expansive, unflinching meditation on loss, our responsibilities toward our children, and the stories we tell ourselves in the wake of traumatic events.

Slowly, inexorably, Gerson writes his way back to Owen, straight to the singularity that cleaved his life into before and after, creating a portrait of grief iridescent in its fullness, and unexpectedly consoling.



Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this book without any obligation to write a positive review. The opinions expressed in this post are mine and may differ from yours. Book information courtesy of amazon.com, the publisher and the back of the book. It is being reviewed as part of LibraryThing's Early Reviewer program.



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copyright Book Dragon's Lair 2009-2016

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In accordance to the FTC guidelines, I must state that I make no monetary gains from my reviews or endorsements here on Book Dragon's Lair. All books I review are either borrowed, purchased by me, given as a gift, won in some kind of contest, or received in exchange for an honest review.